How to Get Into the Oil and Gas Business

So you want to be in the oil and gas business. Good choice. Technically, if you are pumping gas to a local station, you are already in the gas business. (But maybe that’s not what you think.)

If you want to be the right landman, it will help to be part of the right broker and oil and gas consulting firm.

What you already know is the vast possibilities available in the oil and gas business. So, the first thing you need to do is decide which part of business you want.

Positions Available in Oil and Gas Businesses
You can do anything from office administration to offshore drilling. And if the 1998 Bruce Willis movie, Armageddon, is believable, you might even be asked to go into space and save the world. … But maybe not.

Oil Online offers several more realistic options:

What types of positions are available? There are opportunities for field hands, radio operators, heavy machine operators, roustabouts, welders, drivers, and even chefs (just to name a few). Many companies offer training on the job.

For clarification, roustabout is a rough and unskilled worker. That means that although the only thing you bring to the table is high enthusiasm, good work ethic, and strong strength, there’s a place in the business for you.

Qualification
Beyond the entry level, there is a good chance that what you want is a landman. It is a more prestigious position where you are an oil or gas agent that secures and leases mineral rights and land for drilling.

A bachelor’s degree is a minimum qualification, preferably in business, geology, or land management.

Look for schools that are accredited by the American Association of Professional Landmen including, Penn State University, Texas Tech University and the University of Oklahoma.

That’s just the beginning. To join the Professional Landament Association, you need a bachelor’s degree, 7 years of experience in the industry, and a graduation score on a certification test.

It can feel like a catch 22: How do you gain experience? By getting a certificate. How do you get the certificate? By gaining experience. After earning your degree, willing to put in some difficult years. It’s a career, not a job.

Salary
Landmanjobs post details of landman salary statistics by categories such as affiliation, education, experience, and gender.

You just hope to get a low 6. But watch out for the gender gap. The high of this industry. According to this section:

• Men from men earn an average salary of $ 132,851.
• Female landmines generate an average salary of $ 101,991.

Education is another big factor. Over $ 50,000 separates landman with a bachelor’s degree from one with a PhD. Larger gaps can be found during factoring experience.

But even at the lowest level, this is a great job that will soon put you in the high income group.

At the end of the day, you enter the oil and gas business in the same way as entering other businesses that deserve entry, with encouragement, hard work, and dedication.

Start today for a better and more profitable tomorrow.

Cheers and Beers: Laidback Venues in La Plagne

Cheers and Beers: Laidback Venues in La Plagne

Many people believe that après ski is all about thumping music, dancing on tables and staying up all night. Whilst this certainly is possible and great fun on occasion, it is not for everyone.
Fortunately, places like La Plagne have great diversity and suitable establishments for every taste. If your tabletop dancing days are behind you but you still enjoy a few beers and a laugh, La Plagne has plenty of more relaxed, pub-style venues to choose from.

 

These boozers are great places for having a few beers, chilling with your mates and ex-changing your stories from the day with fellow skiers. You can then leave at a reasonable hour and retire to your catered chalet. La Plagne has many great drinking establishments, but read on to find out which ones you simply cannot miss!

Bar La Mine – Brilliantly located in the heart of the action at Plagne 1800, English pub Bar la Mine has DJs and live music, TVs showing live sport and a mining theme. It also has an enormous selection of beers, ciders and wines. It is a popular après spot, so there is always a lively and friendly atmosphere, but there is also plenty of space to sit down and talk or watch the game. The venue is right next to the slopes, making it the perfect place to meet after a long day on the slopes.

Igloo Igloo – This is a funky bar that’s designed like an igloo, and is found inside Plagne Centre’s Galérie du Pelvoux. Step inside and you will be blown away by the neon colours and icy decor, featuring half life-sized polar bears and penguins. Igloo Igloo is a premier spot for DJs and live bands, but you can also sit down on the faux-ice white seats and sip on a homemade cocktail. There are even complimentary nibbles if you get there early, and many patrons comment on the friendliness of the staff.

Le Luna Bar – If you’re looking for a cool rustic-style pub with dim lights, lots of seating and a chilled out atmosphere with occasional live music, Le Luna Bar is the right place for you. It offers a refreshing change of pace from the clubs, which can be hard to have a conversation in. I really like this bar because it has fun pub games on hand, such as table football, darts and pool. Beers, whiskies, cocktails, wines and non-alcoholic drinks are all on the menu, and it is a great spot for a relaxed drink after shredding powder. You can find Le Luna Bar in the Plagne Centre, and is likely to be just a stone’s throw away from your catered chalet. La Plagne regulars often cite this as the best establishment for a relaxed pub in the area.

Bar le 5 a 7 Siete – Bar le 5 a 7 Siete is located in La Plagne Soleil/Village, and is my number one choice for a drink in the area. This cosy wine bar is ideal after a freezing day on the slopes, as you can get comfortable in front of the roaring log fire, sip on your favourite wine and catch up with friends. Alternatively, order tapas and enjoy them out on the brilliant sun terrace, from where you can enjoy lovely views of the surrounding area.

These are just a few of the great drinking establishments, but there are many others to choose from. The best part is that you never have to venture far from your catered cha-let! La Plagne attracts groups of young friends looking for fun yet casual nights out, and it is easy to see why

A Wild Walker Winter Come True Dream!

A Wild Walker Winter Come True Dream!

Winter sports fanatics can quickly become exhausted with the normal activities on offer. For those who crave a call that is really exciting and close to nature, leave skiing in this winter chalet. Walking on the ice and the thrill of every crunch under your feet on the glacier should be the next winter adventure. Glued to the screen at the end of your seat, you have watched a documentary about people climbing the ice, so now is the time to bring the sensation to yourself: try climbing the glacier for a unique experience that has additional benefits. takes place amid some of nature’s most beautiful natural sites. A Wild Walker Winter Come True Dream!
Franz Josef Glacier, New Zealand

The world-famous glacier is only accessible by helicopter, so all the ducks lined up to visit here to be one of the most amazing trips to mark your bucket travel list. Thisglacier continues to move, so the surging streams and floods and falling ice and rock slides are not uncommon. Be sure to check accessibility before you make your way there. But once you’re out there on the ice surrounded by a network of ice niches, blue ice and ice caves, you’ll be burdened by your own sincere feelings in the face of this big and powerful glacier. A Wild Walker Winter Come True Dream!

Chadar Trek, Ladakh, India

This lifelong Indian adventure is a challenge for those who like their difficult treks. The 100km-long 9-12 day journey has a ‘tough’ rating and not for a weak person. You will walk on the frozen Zanskar River, and may even be able to see the icy cold water pouring beneath the ice-frosted layer like the glass where you stand. This is truly an unending adventure: you will be camping in caves along the way and carrying all your own gear. It really is a baptism of fire (or ice!).

Maligne Canyon Icewalk, Canada

If you’d rather have more ice decomposing than plunging into Chadar Trek, then this two hour icewalk complies with the doctor’s orders. High-quality equipment including necessary boots and ice is offered on-site, so you are free to explore frozen waterfalls, towering ice pillars and underground caves in Maligne Canyon Icewalk safely.

Glacier gray, china

Chilean patagonia is bound to make this list, and Gray Glacier is often regarded as the eighth wonder of the world. The glacier itself and surrounding area is very beautiful. There are a number of hiking routes with varying degrees of difficulty leading to the glacier, with some very challenging treks offered for the toughest explorer out there! Strong winds, freezing temperatures and terrain that try to beat you before you even make it to the ice run, but still survive. The mesmerizingly beautiful landscape at the end is more than worth it. A Wild Walker Winter Come True Dream!

Insurance against Use and Tears …

If you have your sights on ice hiking at this destination or elsewhere, you will need winter travel insurance. While the most common policies can be expensive and limiting, there are renowned winter holiday insurance providers such as Let’s Go Insure that offer affordable rates for ice trekking and related activities. With the right insurance rates, even the most famous powdered dog and sensual seeker hunter can go through their own winter wonderland scenario with peace of mind. A Wild Walker Winter Come True Dream!

Ethan Bailey is an experienced adventure traveler and insurance expert with Let’s Go Insure team. Ethan’s spirit is to inspire his clients to go further, deeper and higher on their journey and his expertise in providing ideal insurance allows them to do just that. If you are looking for the best winter sports insurance Let’s Go works with the most experienced underwriters, intermediaries and insurers to offer competitive insurance without sacrificing protection.

The Anatomy of an Archipelago

The Anatomy of an Archipelago

For anyone with an interest in natural history, the group of islands collectively known as the Galapagos Archipelago is one of the most fascinating places on the planet. The region is renowned for its unique wildlife and the vital role it played in naturalist Charles Darwin’s research, from which he developed his revolutionary Theory of Evolution.
While the majority of visitors on guided Galapagos holidays arrive to experience a close encounter with the iconic wildlife, learning a little of the area’s geologic history can enrich the experience even beyond expectation.

 

The Anatomy of an Archipelago

The most common way for an archipelago to form is through constant volcanic activity. (They can also form from continental islands, due to erosion or evaporation of water.) Volcanic archipelagos can form in the ocean and in rivers or lakes as they erupt on beneath the surface of the water. When oceanic, the resulting land masses are known as an “island arc”. In many cases this forms as a result of a “hot spot”, in which parts of the Earth’s crust (tectonic plates) continually shift and create friction.

Where two tectonic plates meet and create a hot spot, magma (red-hot molten rock) can push through the sea floor to create an underwater volcano. As tectonic plates continue to shift over the hot spot, the constant eruptions cause lava to build up and up over millions of years until they emerge from the surface of the ocean to create an island.

In some cases, activity ceases when the tectonic plate eventually moves away from the hot spot. But in others, for example in Hawaii and Japan, the island chains continue to evolve, with many of the volcanoes still active today.

The Geology of Galapagos

The Galapagos Archipelago was formed through the repeated movement of the Nazca tectonic plate over millions of years. As it took place over such a long time period, the eastern islands in the chain are actually millions of years older than some of those in the west. The younger ones, like Isabela and Fernandina, for example, are thought to only be around a few hundred thousand years old, and are still in formation today. Some of the older ones, like San Cristobal and Espanola, may be up to five million years old – still relatively young in the history of the world. With the exception of Isabela (which, as the largest, is made up of six), each island was formed from a single volcano.

Due to their volcanic nature, most of the islands in the chain have a similar conical appearance, but they range from those with very low, gentle slopes to some that soar steeply more than 5,000 feet above sea level. It is this varied of topography that has created the astonishing diversity of habitat that supports the magnificent array of unique wildlife – much of which is endemic.

Discover a Unique Region on Galapagos Holidays

The geology and ecology of this isolated island chain make it one of the most unique places in the world. For those who want to learn more, organised small group Galapagos holidays provide the opportunity to explore this rich, bio-diverse part of the planet in an intimate, educational and truly memorable way.

What is Diesel Exhaust Fluid? Who needs it?

Here are a few quizzes:

When will emissions rules produce better trucks?

If you answered, “What about the 2008 Clean Air Act Standard or the Clean Air Act Standard”, you can stop reading. You probably already know everything in this post.

For the rest of you, the answer is, “When it becomes clear that diesel exhaust, or DEF, is an important part of the solution to emissions problems.

Everyone who’s ever driven behind an older bus or semi-belching smoke and diesel exhaust knows the problem: Diesel engines are dirty and smelly.

That’s the price we pay for power and torque that the gasoline engine can not be the same.

DEF brought the price down.

This is the reason.

Diesel Penalty …
The combustion takes place on the gasoline engine cylinder when the spark ignites a mixture of fuel and air.

A diesel does not use sparks. Instead, it greatly compresses the slimmer air fuel mixture.

This is a high level of compression that causes the fuel to ignite.

Unfortunately, the compression ignition process also produces higher emissions of harmful nitrogen (NO) and particulate oxides.

… And the solution
To meet air quality standards that call for lower NO levels, manufacturers adopt an approach called “selective catalytic reduction,” or SCR.

With SCR, a small amount of liquid is sprayed into the exhaust stream. The chemical reactions that occur convert NO emissions into nitrogen and harmless water.

Actually, coming out of a solar exhaust using an SCR may be cleaner than going into the machine in the first place.

That’s very helpful in 2010. It’s important in 2017 when regulations call for a 90% reduction in the allowable nitrous oxide from the muffler.

The magic responsible for the reduction is DEF: a 32.5% ammonia solution in ionized water. And it is a powerful (and somewhat misunderstood) solution to a serious problem.

What you need to know
DEF lives in a reservoir in your vehicle, which usually accommodates about five gallons.

In GM’s heavy duty truck, customers get about 1,000 miles per gallon of DEF. Heavy transport or towing can increase the level of DEF consumption as well as on fuel.

In consumer vehicles, DEF can be consumed at a speed of about 2.5 gallons per 800 miles of driving.

DEF tank must be kept at least partially full at any time. Many diesel engines will not operate more than 4-5 MPH if the tank dries. Other people will not run away at all.

Fortunately, it should not be a problem, as most manufacturers provide gauges, digital readings or “low-level liquid” warnings on IP.

And keep the tank terminated easily and relatively cheaply.

Manufacturers have built DEF services into their scheduled maintenance specifications. So the liquid can be terminated when the owner brings their vehicle to a scheduled service.

And DIY-ers can easily maintain their own DEF level, just like a washing machine fluid. The liquid is readily available at dealerships, truck stops and auto parts, usually around $ 5 / gallon.

Truck stops often have DEF pumps on their fuel island.

Reversed
Perhaps the biggest misconception about DEF is that this is an obstacle to performance.

Actually, the opposite is happening. Manufacturers have tuned their diesel engines so that DEF really optimizes combustion.

That means better fuel efficiency, more power, less machine wear and high reliability.

And there is another myth:

DEF evaporates quickly. (Actually, it evaporates very slowly.)

This is a bottleneck on mileage. (In fact, it offers better mileage than most other emission reduction systems The manufacturer estimates a five percent mileage.)

It’s poisonous. (Actually, this is less toxic than many other liquids used in the vehicle, and has been used for many years in commercial trucks and ag industries.)

Some Warnings
While DEF is good for newer machines with DEF systems, there is no point in old diesel engines lacking such a system.

And DEF should not be added directly to fuel. It’s corrosive and can reduce your fuel system to a worthless piece.

That’s why some manufacturers give access beneath to the system. The others provide a separate filler neck next to the fuel cap.

Either way, if you suspect your fuel has been contaminated with DEF, do not ignite the ignition to the accessories, which can activate the fuel system.

Instead, take the withdrawn vehicle, without starting, to the workshop. Ask them to flush the fuel tank, then again enjoy the power of diesel, torque, and possible reliability

Beyond Skiing: The Natural and Cultural Wonders of Chamonix

 

Beyond Skiing: The Natural and Cultural Wonders of Chamonix

Attention, ski enthusiasts! Chamonix is renowned for its fantastic skiing – and for good reason! However, this means that its other wonderful attractions are frequently overlooked. You’ve just stepped off your shuttle from Geneva to Chamonix… now how about something a little different? For something distinctly non-touristy yet incredibly worthwhile, why not wander off the beaten skiing track and try some of these alternative activities?
Natural Highlights

 

Visit the Mer de Glace

At 200m deep, this is France’s largest glacier. It flows 7km down Mont Blanc’s northern side, moving at a rate of up to 1cm an hour or 90m per year. The ‘Sea of Ice’ is stunning to behold, and after the 430 steps that lead into the grotto, you’ll see some of the best crystal specimens in the Mont Blanc massif. It is reachable by the Train du Montenvers, a picturesque cog railway that will bring you to an altitude of 1913m, from where you can access the Grotte de Glace by cable car. The entry price also gains you access to the Glacorium, which examines the birth, life and future of glaciers – so hold on to your ticket!

Take the Cable Car to the Aiguille du Midi

Rising to 3842m at its peak, the Aiguille du Midi is perhaps Chamonix’s most noteworthy geographical feature. If the altitude doesn’t put you off, you’ll be rewarded with 360-degree panoramic views of the French, Italian and Swiss Alps, which will literally take your breath away.

You can take the cable car Téléphérique de l’Aiguille du Midi all year round, and the journey itself is quite spectacular. Either hop out halfway at Plan de l’Aiguille to begin hiking or paragliding, or continue to the top for views in every direction, thanks to the glass floor of the ‘Step into the Void’ attraction.

Be aware that even in summer, it will be only be about -10°C at the summit, while temperatures can plummet as low as -25°C in winter.

Cultural Highlights

Musée des Cristaux

This museum is home to a dazzling display of crystals from the Mont Blanc massif, and there are also rocks and minerals on display here. The Espace Alpinisme section focuses on the art and science of mountaineering. It has interesting interactive displays and mesmerising videos and photos of ascents that must be seen to be believed.

Musée Alpin

This collection focuses on the region’s rich history of Alpine adventure, including highlights such as the first ascent of Mont Blanc by a woman, and the cliff-hanging exploits of Jacques Balmat on his quest for crystals.

How to Get There

There are plenty of budget airlines that fly from the UK to Geneva. To get from Geneva to Chamonix, why not book a quick and easy airport transfer? Shuttle Direct offers both private and group shuttles from Geneva to Chamonix, guaranteeing a convenient and pleasant start to your trip.

When it’s Time to Repair Your Plate Heat Exchangers

 

If you’re already using plate heat exchanges, you probably already know how critical they are for your business.

But what happens when they break? Here’s how you can know when it’s time to embark on the plate refurbishment process.

Weigh your options
If you’re in the position where your plate heat exchanger has completely broken, then the first thing you need to do is to be repaired or repaired. Whether it’s an old furnace or a commercial refrigeration unit, this is a big decision and can have a major impact on your bottom line.

First, you’ll want to know that it’s actually the plate heat exchanger that’s not working. If it’s a furnace, have you eliminated all other possible problems?

For example, there’s no point in undergoing the plate refurbishment process if it’s actually an electrical problem or a clogged filter.

Second, you want to determine the associated associated. We have a free quote service so you can get a good idea of ​​what you’re getting into nice and early if you decide to refurbish and fix rather than buy new.

Finally, you’ll want to look at the replacement unit just to compare. Contact your local dealer and browse any online commercial stores.

It is also worth looking at the used market to see if you can pick up a deal. If your unit is especially old, sometimes the best option is to buy an old unit and actually refurbish THOSE heat exchanging plates, giving you the most cost effective solution.

How old is your unit?
Whether you’re looking at second-hand units or just trying to date yours to make the best decision, you’ll probably want to know how old it is. Some of the experts will write the installation date on the unit, giving you the age.

However, if it’s not there, you can still figure it out. Just look around for any manufacturer information, serial numbers, or model numbers (so you may have to turn the unit off if you have not already).

After that, it’s just a matter of Googling the manufacturing number and seeing what comes back. If that does not work, you can always call your manufacturer’s helpline.

What can a refurbishment do?
10-20 years of use.

But what are the benefits of taking on the plate refurbishment process?

The biggest benefit of plate refurbishment instead of replacement is that it’s a cost-effective way to expand the life of your heat exchanger plate. By simply cleaning it through our exhaustive process, we can restore a shocking amount of life and viability into the tool.

Second, it means that you can put off a major new purchase. It also means that your initial investment into a quality unit is going to continue to reap dividends. Assuming the plates are not cracked (we check), after cleaning and new gaskets your unit might last anywhere from another 10-20 years.

Wrapping up
Knowing whether it is time to clean and maintain your heat exchanger plates is not easy. But if you carefully evaluate your unit, it’s age, and your own financial circumstances, you can not go wrong.

The Finest Vineyards in France: The Wine of Saint-Émilion

The Finest Vineyards in France: The Wine of Saint-Émilion

Part of experiencing of the culture and heritage of any place to is to taste it. In Bordeaux, this means sampling the area’s many rich wines from one of the oldest and largest growing regions. For connoisseurs, Bordeaux is a paradise for enjoying wine tours.
Saint-Émilion is a must-see region for any traveller in search of the finest wine, which is bound to exceed your highest expectations. On board Rosa, you’ll experience a wide range of luxurious flavours, whether it’s a rich and full-bodied red, or a light and aromatic white.

 

UNESCO World Heritage Site

In 1999, Saint-Émilion was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and it’s easy to see why. The history of grape-growing in the region is like no other, as the taste proves. Saint-Émilion, the oldest and largest appellation in Bordeaux, dictates over 5,500 hectares of land to growing grapes.

On board Rosa, you’ll cruise along the Dordogne River, soaking up the sights, smells and tastes of Bordeaux. Learn all about the varieties of wines produced here, from Médoc to the left to the vast selection found on the right bank of the river.

Types of Grape

Two of the most widely grown grapes in Saint-Émilion are the Merlot and the Cabernet Franc. Differing in taste and structure, these varieties have something for every connoisseur’s palate.

Merlot is composed of a rich, full-bodied combination of flavours with hints of plum, blackberries, dark cherries and chocolate, while Cabernet Franc is lighter and floral. The latter has become increasingly popular in recent years, due to its ability to thrive in spite of changes in climate.

Saint-Émilion Soil

Wines vary greatly in this region, which is due in large part to the differences in soil from vineyard to vineyard. For the most part, Grand Cru wines that are produced in this area are grown in soils that are rich in limestone, which can be found in the hills that surround Saint-Émilion. This greatly benefits the grapes, as the soil has vital minerals, such as calcium, that are needed to help vines grow. What’s more, its consistency provides excellent drainage.

Alternatively, the soil around Canon-La-Graffeliére boasts a sandy texture, which produces widely enjoyed and lighter-bodied tipples. When you join one of the many wine tours on offer, you can discover even more about the growing conditions and flavours of the region.

Itinerary Imperatives

When travelling through France, wine tours must be on any itinerary. You’ll be able to wow friends and family back home with your extensive knowledge at dinner parties and events. While on board Rosa, you’ll experience the process of wine-making from the very first grapes harvested to the first sip of a freshly uncorked bottle. You won’t find a more authentic or delicious taste of France anywhere.

Paul Newman is the Marketing and E-Systems Executive for European Waterways, the UK’s most respected provider of all-inclusive, luxury barge holidays. Offering holidays to France and other great destinations, itineraries include wine tours and other cultural and themed activities. Part of a team of experienced barging aficionados, Paul is first in line to endorse the perks of a slow-paced barge cruise to anyone looking for a unique holiday experience.

5 Mistakes To Avoid When Growing Marijuana

The legal cannabis market of North America was valued at $ 6.7 billion in January 2017.

It’s an appealing idea to invest in that market, but to smokers, it might be more appealing to just grow the plant yourself. But if you get it wrong, you’ll end up with a disappointing crop.

Here are 5 key mistakes you must avoid when caring for your weed.

Not testing the soil pH
Acid to alkaline scale is measured with a unit called ‘pH’. Cannabis plants prefer a very slightly acidic soil, hitting around 5.5 to 6 on the pH scale.

The garden center where you buy the soil should be able to help you pick a suitable degree of acidity.

However, it’s still a good idea to test your soil to make sure it’s OK. Otherwise, your weed might not as much as you’d hoped.

Not testing the water pH
Just like with soil, cannabis is very sensitive to the pH of the water you use. For the best results, you want to be using water that’s between 6 and 7 pH.

This helps the plants absorb nutrients effectively, which in turn helps them grow.

If the water from your taps is too alkaline, you can add other substances or buy filters to lower the pH – but do not overdo it and push it too far the other way.

Overwatering your weed
If you were not a keen gardener before, do not fall for the common mistake of watering your plants too often.

They do not need to be topped up every few hours. If the topsoil feels dry to the touch, feel free to give them a splash – but if it’s still moist then do not add any more water.

Make sure that there’s adequate and unblocked drainage underneath the plants too, so that excess water can run out once the soil is soaked. Otherwise, it’ll pool at the bottom of your pots, which can cause problems.

Not keeping the plants warm
Cannabis does best in a warm climate. If you do not live in one, do not expect your plants to do very well outdoors.

How to grow weed if you’re in a cold country? Bring your plants into a greenhouse or other covered area, and kit it out with heat lamps. A target temperature of around 75 ° F is just about right.

Make sure there is decent ventilation, but not so much that you are getting cold from drafts. And if the plants are inside, remember to make sure there is also plenty of light.

Not thinking about the strains
There are hundreds of cannabis strains. You need to know what you’re growing for two very reasons.

Firstly, if you’re going to sell this, you need to know exactly what you’re selling.

Secondly, if you’re growing multiple strains you need to make a clear schedule detailing which strain is growing where, and research the different needs of each.

Cannabis strains can have very different requirements for healthy growth. So you need to be on top of what’s what, and make sure their needs are being met.

You plants may mature at different times, and you need to make sure the harvests are timely and efficient.

Good luck!
Growing cannabis is not as easy a task as it first may seem. But it can be hugely rewarding.

You never know what the quality of the pot is like at your local dispensary. But you can ensure the quality of your own crop if you keep it healthy.

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Underwater Shipwrecks: The Most Dramatic of Dive Sites

Whether you’re a seasoned diver or just starting out, there’s an undeniable romanticism and sense of adventure around wreck dives that you won’t be able to get elsewhere. The excitement builds while you’re in a speedboat zipping through the immense expanse of blue, wind whipping your hair and you into a frenzy. Often you’ll not spot any signs of civilisation as far as the eye can see and then, suddenly, with all your gear securely in place, it’s overboard and underwater into a magical world where ghostly ship remains loom as if from nowhere, waiting to be explored…
If this sounds tempting, the reality is much better. Do these thrilling historical sites offering spectacular dives, stunning reefs and enchanting folklore call to you? Great: here are three of the best this fine planet has to offer.

 

Townsville, Australia

The Great Barrier Reef is the a fabulous dive site any diver worth their salt has explored, and this British-built luxury passenger ship which fell victim to a cyclone back in 1911 is arguably its crowning jewel. Teeming with marine life and a spectacular ship in itself, if you’re only ever going to take the plunge with one wreck dive ever then this should be a strong contender.

Grand Anse, Grenada

The Bianca C has become known as the Titanic of the Caribbean after it sank in 1961 due to a boiler room explosion and consequent fire which lasted several days. At 180 metres (600 feet) long, this is the largest shipwreck you can dive in the Caribbean. If you have your full wreck dive insurance certifications then you’re in for even more fun as you’ll have multiple chances to enter the wreck.

Chuuk Lagoon, Federated States of Micronesia

Are you on the hunt for a travel destination which boasts a true wealth of wreck diving options? Then look no further than Micronesia. This little section of paradise in Oceania is undoubtedly the place for you. In years gone by it was thought to be the most formidable of Japanese strongholds in the whole of the Pacific during WWII, and Chuuk Lagoon was completely devastated after an American attack on the base back in 1944. 249 aircraft, 32 merchant ships and 12 warships sank, with over 20 wrecks having been discovered since. You’ll be like a kid in a sweetshop deciding which dives to do — some of the most popular include the 500 foot (153 metre) Shikoku Maru and the 440 foot (134 metre) Fujikawa Maru.

Mayday Mayday!

Not every travel insurance covers you for wreck diving, and some dive insurance won’t cover you below 18 metres. Let’s Go Insure’s dive insurance provides cover for up to 50 metres as long as you have the necessary qualifications. Get in touch with our team today to make sure your once in a lifetime dive insurance needs are met.